BBC TV Licence goes up & BBC gives 500 staff 25% wage rises – and flouts its own pay band rules for over 1,500 employees

The BBC has sparked fury after giving staff a 25 per cent pay rise and paying more than 1,500 employees more than their salary bands.

Out of 17,561 employees in the BBC’s salary band structure, some 1,532 receive more than their stated salary band, according to figures obtained by The Times.

This comes as it was revealed nearly 500 staff were given pay rises of more than 25 per cent.

  • Nearly 500 staff at the BBC have received pay hikes of more than 25 per cent
  • More than 1,500 employees at corporation paid more than stated salary bands
  • Broadcaster breaks its pay guidelines to increase the wages of high-earning staff
Out of 17,561 employees in the BBC’s salary band structure, some 1,532 receive more than their stated salary band

Figures obtained by The Times show that the broadcaster regularly breaks its own pay guidelines in order to increase the wages of high-earning staff.

In grade 10, which includes many news correspondents and presenters, 424 of 1,375 staff are paid above the maximum for their salary band which is £70,000 in London and £66,000 in the rest of the UK.

Lord Hall was last year revealed in the BBC’s annual report to be in the £450,000-£499,999 bracket when the broadcaster published a list of its top earners.

Radio 2’s Chris Evans topped the list on more than £2 million, while the highest paid woman was Claudia Winkleman on between £450,000 and £499,999.

Lord Hall was last year revealed in the BBC’s annual report to be in the £450,000-£499,999 bracket when the broadcaster published a list of its top earners

The BBC said it ‘recognises that there are individuals paid above the salary roof’.

The corporations said such individuals are, ‘predominantly senior specialists who posses a skillset that commands a higher market premium, or in some cases, senior contributors to BBC content’.

Those falling within the Grade 10 bracket – which has a salary of some £46,112 – £70,672 – include news correspondents, presenters and senior specialist roles such a senior lawyer and lead architects.

Those working within the Grade 11 bracket – which has a salary of £51,087 – £78,566 – include commissioning editors, editors, executive producers and heads of department.

A BBC spokesman said: ‘We are changing our terms and conditions and overhauling the current grading structure to address issues such as this. Meanwhile whilst these salary bands are internal guidelines, we have reduced the number of staff earning outside the band since 2010.’

In light of a gender pay gap row at the corporation, the BBC has also said it is working to ensure there it has an equal number of male and female experts across its programmes by April 2019

According to The Sun, nearly 500 staff saw pay rises of more than 25 per cent, 163 other employees received 50 per cent rises or more and one had their pay doubled.

A spokesman said: ‘While there are strict rules around any pay increases it’s only right that when people are promoted or take on extra responsibilities it’s reflected in their salary – and just as at any organisation, there will be a number of cases where people are promoted to a significantly more senior or prominent role or take on a wide range of extra responsibilities.’

In light of a gender pay gap row at the corporation, the BBC has also said it is working to ensure there it has an equal number of male and female experts across its programmes by April 2019.

The broadcaster said it is seeking to guarantee there is a 50:50 split in the expert contributors featured on its news, current affairs and topical programmes

The broadcaster said it is seeking to guarantee there is a 50:50 split in the expert contributors featured on its news, current affairs and topical programmes.

It has already disclosed the BBC has a median gender pay gap of 9.3 per cent and pledged to increase the number of women on screen, on air and in lead roles to 50 per cent in 2020.

And some 200 BBC presenters are being investigated by HMRC for alleged tax avoidance after declaring themselves self-employed, meaning they were paid as contractors rather than staff.

They worked through PSCs, which meant they enjoyed some tax relief while the BBC allegedly saved vast sums in national insurance contributions.

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘The BBC’s use of PSCs was reviewed independently by Deloitte in 2012, which found no evidence of tax avoidance or individuals being forced to move from staff contracts onto PSCs.’
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And some people wonder why the BBC doesn’t want to replace the TV Licence for something else!